Incident directory

1955 - Steam Trawler Andanes, Grimsby Fish Docks

07/04/1955

Country:

UK

  • Ship/ Maritime Incidents

Severity:

Description

Date of event

7th April 1955.

Time of event

Unknown at this time.

Name of premises

Steam Trawler Andanes.

Location

Grimsby Fish Docks, Grimsby.

Service area

Grimsby County Borough Fire Brigade now Humberside Fire and Rescue Service (HFRS).

Nature of incident

Fire within ship/vessel.

Property type

Fishing vessel.

Premises use

Trawler.

Construction type and materials

Unknown at this time.

Occupancy

Unknown at this time.

Fire source and location of fire

Onboard anthracite furnace/stove with an apparently improvised feed slide/shute that was burned off about 4 inches from the end (Bell 2, 1955).

Synopsis

Brief Synopsis

A Sub Officer (SubO) died due to Carbon Monoxide (CO) poisoning at a ship fire incident whilst attempting a live rescue (House & Settle, 2016).

Grimsby County Borough Fire Brigade had been called to rescue 2 men who had been overcome by ‘fumes’ on board the Steam Trawler Andanes. The watchman of the trawler Serron, lying nearby, had discovered the Andanes watchman unconscious in the foc’sle and had called a passer-by to assist. They could not affect a rescue and the passer by also collapsed. The ambulance service was called but they were also affected by the fumes. The fire service was then called who then also got into difficulty carrying out the rescues (Unknown Author, 1955).

According to Bell, 1955 and Bell 2, 1955 the Ffs were wearing breathing apparatus (BA) during the rescue attempt. ‘It was clear that by some accidental means – during rescue attempts – the fireman’s breathing apparatus which was of the latest kind, must have been dislodged sufficiently to enable carbon monoxide gas to enter in sufficient quantities to prove lethal’ (Bell 2, 1955). The 1955 Fire article makes reference to ‘apparently ineffective’ BA sets.

Chief Fire Officer A. T. Bell said the gas did not affect either their heads or lungs, but their legs’. ‘‘We were quite unaware of anything until our knees gave way’’ (Bell, 1955). ‘Grimsby’s Chief Fire Officer Mr A. T. Bell described rescue attempts and how he found firemen, wearing breathing apparatus in a stupefied condition’ (Bell 2, 1995).

At least 7 firefighters (Ffs) ended up in hospital and 3 persons, including the SubO, the Ships Watchman and the Ships Engineer died during the incident. 2 ambulance men who had also been exposed to the fumes and had then taken 7 of the Ffs to hospital and were still ‘groggy’ from the rescue attempts that they had made previously, also collapsed at hospital (Unknown Author 2, 1955). Bell 2, 1955 states 11 persons were taken to hospital in total.

As a result of enquiries, he (The Coroner at The Inquest) had heard of a machine, which, when carbon monoxide levels grew to dangerous proportions gave an audible warning’. ‘The coroner asked that literature sent to him by the company manufacturing the machine should be brought to the attention of the trawlers owners’ (Bell 2, 1995).

Further information hoping to be identified and still to be located.

Main findings, key lessons & areas for learning

Further information hoping to be identified and still to be located.

Fire & Rescue Service summary of main findings, conclusions, key lessons & recommendations

Further information hoping to be identified and still to be located.

FBU summary of main findings, conclusions, key lessons & recommendations

Further information hoping to be identified and still to be located.

Other report summary of main findings, conclusions, key lessons &recommendations

Further information hoping to be identified and still to be located.

IFE Commentary & lessons if applicable

None produced at this time.

Known available source documents

Further information hoping to be identified and still to be located.

FRS Incident Report/s

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

FBU Incident Report/s

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

Health & Safety Executive (HSE) Incident Report/s and/or improvement notices

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

Humberside Police Incident Report/s

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

Yorkshire Ambulance Service Incident Report

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

Building Research Establishment (BRE) Reports/investigations/research

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

Coroner’s report/s and/or Rule 43 and/or Regulation 28 Notices etc

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

Dear Chief Officer Letters (DCOL), FRS Circulars, FRS Notices and/or Bulletins etc and/or Related Government Correspondence

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

Notifications from National Operational Learning User Group (NOLUG) and/or Joint Emergency Services Interoperability Principles (JESIP)

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

Other information sources

House, A. & Settle, P. et al. (2017). The firefighter memorial trust book of remembrance. [Online]. Available at; http://www.theonlinebookcompany.com/OnlineBooks/FirefighterMemorialTrust/Content/Filler  [Accessed 20th September 2017]. The Firefighters Memorial Trust.

Note. With the above source reference, it is not currently possible to link directly to the relevant page of the memorial book.

Unknown Author. (1955). Mystery fumes kill three. Fire. (June). Page 28.

 Pic 02

Unknown Author 2. (1955). Sub-Officer G. W. A. Woods. Fire. (June). Page 38.

 Pic 03

Bell, A. T. (1955). Grimsby fire officer dies. Fire Protection Review. (May). Page 280.

 Pic 04

Bell, A. T. 2 (1955). Grimsby gassing accident fireman’s bravery cited at inquest. Fire Protection Review. (July). Page 446.

 Pic 05

Further information hoping to be identified and still to be located.

Service learning material

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

Videos available

No information identified to date and/or still to be located.

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